Tonight's Sky
Sun
Sun
Moon
Moon
Mercury
Mercury
Venus
Venus
Mars
Mars
Jupiter
Jupiter
Saturn
Saturn

Tonight's Sky — Change location

OR

Searching...

Tonight's Sky — Select location

Tonight's Sky — Enter coordinates

° '
° '

To celebrate Pi Day tonight, seek out the circular constellation Corona Borealis

March 14 (3/14) is the yearly celebration of the mathematical constant Pi, which permeates the sciences.

1CoronaBorealisCC
A semicircle of stars make up the small constellation Corona Borealis the Northern Crown. Tonight, being Pi Day, makes for the perfect night to seek out this circular sight.
Till Credner/Wikimedia Commons
By pinpointing this brilliant star Arcturus tonight, you can begin tracing a constellation perfectly suited for observation on March 14 — also known as Pi Day.

Pi day, which was designated by the U.S. House of Representatives in 2009, celebrates the well-known mathematical constant Pi (π). For you non-geeks, Pi Day is 3/14 because the first three digits of the mathematical constant pi, which is the ratio of a circle's circumference to its diameter, are 3.14.

As midnight approaches tonight, look to the east for the bright star Arcturus. At magnitude 0.0, it is the second-brightest star visible from mid-northern latitudes.

If you scan about 20° to the left and a little below this luminary, you should see a conspicuous semicircle of stars: the constellation Corona Borealis the Northern Crown.

This small constellation is the most prominent group of stars having a shape reminiscent of a circle, and it makes it an ideal target for Pi Day — a day where we celebrate all things circular.

For more quick and easy observing tips, check out The sky this week for March 8 to 17.
0

JOIN THE DISCUSSION

Read and share your comments on this article
Comment on this article
Want to leave a comment?
Only registered members of Astronomy.com are allowed to comment on this article. Registration is FREE and only takes a couple minutes.

Login or Register now.
0 comments
ADVERTISEMENT

FREE EMAIL NEWSLETTER

Receive news, sky-event information, observing tips, and more from Astronomy's weekly email newsletter. View our Privacy Policy.

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
asy_blackholes_300x250

Click here to download a FREE Black Holes PDF curated by Astronomy magazine.

Find us on Facebook