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Unraveling the web of a cosmic creepy-crawly

A new Hubble image is the best-ever view of the Tarantula Nebula, a region full of star clusters, glowing gas, and dark dust.
RELATED TOPICS: STARS | NEBULAE | HUBBLE TELESCOPE
Tarantula Nebula
New Hubble infrared view of the Tarantula Nebula.
NASA/ESA/E. Sabbi (STScI)
This new Hubble image is the best-ever view of the Tarantula Nebula, a region full of star clusters, glowing gas, and dark dust. Astronomers are exploring and mapping this nebula as part of the Hubble Tarantula Treasury Project (HTTP) in a bid to try to understand its starry anatomy.

The Tarantula Nebula is located in one of our closest galactic neighbors, the Large Magellanic Cloud. Hubble has released images of this celestial spider several times before. While these images showed striking panoramic views of this turbulent region, this new image gives us the deepest and most detailed view yet.

Created using observations taken as part of the HTTP, this image is composed of near-infrared observations from both Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) and Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS). Due to the combination of infrared filters in this image, a purple haze fills the frame with deep red wisps of dust and bright stars scattered throughout.

This region is an example of an HII region — a large cloud of partially ionized hydrogen within which new stars are being born. Visible to the left of center is a sparkling star cluster known as R136. It was initially identified as a star, but astronomers puzzled over how one single monstrous star could ionize a giant HII region. However, astronomers later realized it was actually a cluster of stars — a super star cluster.

R136 will eventually become a globular cluster — a spherical ball of old stars that orbits around the center of its host galaxy. R136 is so massive that it contributes greatly to the Tarantula’s brightness, emitting most of the energy that makes the nebula so visible.

The HTTP is scanning and imaging many of the stars within the Tarantula, mapping out the locations and properties of the nebula’s stellar inhabitants. These observations will help astronomers view the nebula and piece together an understanding of its structure.
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