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Satellite 'fake out'

In honor of NFL training camps starting in July, let’s compare an Earth-orbiting satellite to a running back.
OMearaStephen

A common trick in American football is for a ball carrier to take a quick step forward in one direction — making it appear he’s heading that way — only to change direction at high speed, thereby confusing the defender to avoid being tackled. It’s called a “fake out,” and it not only works on the playing field, but also in the night sky with some pretty shifty satellites.

A visual trickster
It doesn’t matter how skilled we are as observers, satellites have no shortage of visual tricks to confuse our brain as they sail across the playing field of the night sky. While satellites look like “stars” that move at a steady clip in one direction, it’s common for them to appear to gently weave among the other stars like a running back heading for the end zone.

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