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How can a quark-antiquark interaction make an electron? A quark is an elementary particle and is not made of an electron and other particles.

Ted Varga, Orem, Utah
RELATED TOPICS: SPACE PHYSICS
The collision of an up quark and an up antiquark can create an electron and positron because the collision forms a virtual photon, which decays into an electron and its antiparticle, a positron.

You are absolutely correct that a quark and an antiquark are fundamental particles, yet they can interact and form new ones. When they meet, they intermingle and form a “virtual photon” — a photon that lives for only a very short time. A photon is another name for a particle of light, like those that make up what you see from a light bulb or those that compose higher-energy X-rays.

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