Tonight's Sky
Sun
Sun
Moon
Moon
Mercury
Mercury
Venus
Venus
Mars
Mars
Jupiter
Jupiter
Saturn
Saturn

Tonight's Sky — Change location

OR

Searching...

Tonight's Sky — Select location

Tonight's Sky — Enter coordinates

° '
° '
MarsSaturn_sliderlarge

Planet pairing

Mars passes Saturn tonight, providing a striking color contrast as darkness falls

Learn more »

Astronomy on DVD

Explore Astronomy magazine on DVD!

Order today »

Prepare for landing

Rosetta scientists narrow down locations for comet lander

Learn more »

Norway1_sliderlarge

Join Astronomy's Aurora Adventure

Experience a once-in-a-lifetime northern lights tour along the Norwegian coast and interior with Astronomy magazine and TravelQuest International.

See the brochure »

A must-have app!

Put the universe at your fingertips

Purchase today »

Moon map

The best-ever global color map of Neptune's strange moon Triton

Learn more »

P20974_app_563x452_2

GET IT NOW!

Astronomy is available in the app store!

Learn more>>


Why Join?

Get more from Astronomy.com!

Register Today »

Supernova study

Chandra searches for trigger of January supernova in M82

Learn more »

P22861_564x453

Get started in the hobby!

Find your way around the night sky with our new app!

Buy now »

Midsize measurement

Confirming the existence of intermediate-mass black holes

Learn more »

Uwingu Mars

Name a crater ... make an impact!

Learn more »

Starmus_rotatorlarge

Starmus 2014 Rocks Astronomy!

Join astronomy’s greatest minds in the Canary Islands, September 22–27, 2014. New speakers continue to be announced!

Get the latest info »

Observing Basics

Your Eyes & Observing

Watch now »

Comet close-up

Rosetta becomes the first spacecraft to rendezvous with a comet

Learn more »

Planet pairing

Mars passes Saturn tonight, providing a striking color contrast as darkness falls

Learn more »

PICTURE OF THE DAYsee all »

Comet Jacques (C/2014 E2)

Comet Jacques passes the Heart Nebula (IC 1805, middle) and the Baby Nebula (IC 1848, lower left) in this three-image compilation. Both of these clouds of glowing hydrogen lie in the constellation Cassiopeia the Queen. (4-inch apochromatic refractor at f/5, PL-11002 CCD camera, LRGB image with exposures of 5, 1, 1, and 1 minute, respectively, taken remotely from the iTelescope.net facility in New Mexico, August 19, 20, and 21, 2014)
ADVERTISEMENT

FREE EMAIL NEWSLETTER

Receive news, sky-event information, observing tips, and more from Astronomy's weekly email newsletter.

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Loading...