Tonight's Sky
Sun
Sun
Moon
Moon
Mercury
Mercury
Venus
Venus
Mars
Mars
Jupiter
Jupiter
Saturn
Saturn

Tonight's Sky — Change location

OR

Searching...

Tonight's Sky — Select location

Tonight's Sky — Enter coordinates

° '
° '
LunarEclipseS_sliderlarge

Sharing totality

Submit your lunar eclipse photos to our Online Reader Gallery to share your experience with others!

Learn more »

Meet Mars

The Red Planet reaches its peak in the constellation Virgo this month

Learn more »

New moon?

A new small icy object discovered within the rings of Saturn

Learn more »

Starmus_rotatorlarge

Starmus 2014 Rocks Astronomy!

Join astronomy’s greatest minds in the Canary Islands, September 22–27, 2014. New speakers continue to be announced!

Get the latest info »

Astronomy on DVD!

Bring the cosmos to your computer!

Order now »

Student Story Contest!

Enter to win a copy of David A. Aguilar's new book!

Learn more »

P22125_564x453

Introducing Cosmic Origins!

Our one-of-a-kind interactive app puts the universe at your fingertips!

Learn more »

Why Join?

Get more from Astronomy.com!

Register Today »

Exact expansion

The most precise measurement yet of cosmic expansion

Learn more »

P20974_app_563x452_2

GET IT NOW!

Astronomy is available on the App Store!

Learn more »

COSMOS Hangouts

Get expert insights on each episode

Watch now »

Enceladus ocean

New evidence that Saturn’s moon harbors a large underground ocean

Learn more »

Cosmic Adventures

Animals launched into space

Watch now »

Uwingu Mars

Name a crater ... make an impact!

Learn more »

Sharing totality

Submit your lunar eclipse photos to our Online Reader Gallery to share your experience with others!

Learn more »

PICTURE OF THE DAYsee all »

Sinus Iridum

The imager sent in these comments: “This is what the Virtual Moon Atlas calls an ‘exceptional formation,’ and I do agree. When you see it at this lighting there’s always a slight gasp at the glittering Montes Jura and the two Promentoria at the entrance of the Bay of Rainbows. Unfortunately, due to the curvature of the Moon, I don’t think you could see both if you were standing between them. I like how Helicon and Le Verrier look in this image. The smallest features I could make out in this seeing measure just under 2 kilometers.” (8-inch Telescope Engineering Company TEC-8 Maksutov-Cassegrain reflector at f/20, Celestron Skyris 445M CCD camera, best 500 of 1,500 images taken, stacked, taken November 14, 2013, at 2h25m UT)
ADVERTISEMENT

FREE EMAIL NEWSLETTER

Receive news, sky-event information, observing tips, and more from Astronomy's weekly email newsletter.

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Loading...