Tonight's Sky
Sun
Sun
Moon
Moon
Mercury
Mercury
Venus
Venus
Mars
Mars
Jupiter
Jupiter
Saturn
Saturn

Tonight's Sky — Change location

OR

Searching...

Tonight's Sky — Select location

Tonight's Sky — Enter coordinates

° '
° '
Pluto070115_sliderlarge

Methane, but no new moons

New color images of Pluto show two different faces on the mysterious planet as New Horizons discovers no new moons or rings in its flight path

Learn more »

Get timely coverage of the heavens above

Fitful reawakening

Black hole in Cygnus wakes up after 26 years

Learn more »

P23641_ASY_Norway_564x453

Join Astronomy's Aurora Adventure

Experience a once-in-a-lifetime northern lights tour with Astronomy magazine and TravelQuest International

See the brochure »

Year of Pluto

Revelations of a distant world

Explore the latest »

Big eater

M87 has swallowed an entire galaxy in the last billion years

Learn more »

P25368_563x462

Sign Up for Astronomy's five-part Observing Essentials email series!

Hubble at 25

How the space telescope changed the cosmos

Learn more »

Two for one

Simulation suggests black holes may make ideal dark matter labs

Learn more »

BaliRotator

Indonesian Islands Eclipse

Explore Bali and witness a total solar eclipse in March 2016 with Astronomy magazine and TravelQuest International

View the brochure »

Venus volcanism

Evidence of hot lava flows discovered on Venus

Learn more »

Uwingu Mars

Name a crater ... make an impact!

Learn more »

564x453_SoA_RB

Exclusive podcast series

Editor David J. Eicher conducts extensive interviews with the world's top astrophysicists, planetary scientists, and cosmologists

Listen now »

Ends July 24, 2015

Stellar beginnings

Best observational evidence of the universe's first-generation stars

Learn more »

Methane, but no new moons

New color images of Pluto show two different faces on the mysterious planet as New Horizons discovers no new moons or rings in its flight path

Learn more »

PICTURE OF THE DAYsee all »

Venus meets Jupiter in the evening

Jupiter and Venus were closest the evening of June 30, but this photographer’s location had cloudy skies predicted for it. He chose to go out one day early and capture the two planets in a clear sky from the shore of Georgian Bay. (Canon 6D DSLR, Canon EF24–105mm f/4L IS USM lens set at 47mm and f/9, ISO 400, 3.2-second exposure, taken June 29, 2015, at 10:05 p.m. EDT, from Big Bay, Ontario, Canada)
ADVERTISEMENT

FREE EMAIL NEWSLETTER

Receive news, sky-event information, observing tips, and more from Astronomy's weekly email newsletter.

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Loading...