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Pluto's alien atmosphere

New Horizons looked back at Pluto and caught a ring of atmospheric haze as the backlit world was silhouetted by the Sun.

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Heart of the matter

Pluto’s icy plains, pits, and mountains take shape

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Join Astronomy's Aurora Adventure

Experience a once-in-a-lifetime northern lights tour with Astronomy magazine and TravelQuest International

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Hubble at 25

How the space telescope changed the cosmos

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Ancient mega-Earth

Kepler finds a super-Earth around an aging Sun-like star

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Even more mountains

Pluto's heart is home to a second range of ice mountains

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Uwingu Mars

Name a crater ... make an impact!

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Indonesian Islands Eclipse

Explore Bali and witness a total solar eclipse in March 2016 with Astronomy magazine and TravelQuest International

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Take the Universe With You!

E.T. investment

Billionaire gives $100 million for new SETI search

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Exclusive podcast series

Editor David J. Eicher conducts extensive interviews with the world's top astrophysicists, planetary scientists, and cosmologists

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Year of Pluto

Revelations of a distant world

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Starry similarities

Brown dwarfs form in a process similar to stars

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Pluto's alien atmosphere

New Horizons looked back at Pluto and caught a ring of atmospheric haze as the backlit world was silhouetted by the Sun.

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PICTURE OF THE DAYsee all »

An Alpha Capricornid

This photographer described what he captured as the brightest meteor he had ever seen. It exploded like a sparkler at the end and even left a reflection on the lake (the green color reflection on the bottom right part of the tree). The parent body of the Alpha Capricornid meteor shower is Comet 169P/NEAT, a Jupiter family comet that orbits the Sun once every 4.2 years. (Canon 6D, Canon EF 17-40mm f/4L USM lens set at 17mm and f/4.5, ISO 10000, 10-second exposure, taken July 25, 2015, at 8:08 P.M. local time, from Lake Taupo, New Zealand)
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